What we do

About Syria

The crisis in Syria has created the worst humanitarian catastrophe of our time, and with the crisis in its seventh-year the Syrian people are still seeking a dignified life and a better future but are struggling to barely survive. Despite all the grief, the pain and deprivation that the Syrians have been subjected to for decades, they are now having to make enormous sacrifices and take huge risks to adapt to the changes needed in order to meet for their families and communities most basic needs, in keeping with their cultural traditions.

As a result of the continued chaos of the crisis, the Syrian society recognizes the need to reorganize and rebuild its institutions, with the most important institution consisting of the local councils in Syria. These local councils are considered as elected bodies that reflect the views of their communities and seek to achieve their aims as well as run and manage services needed. The councils provide essential public services, from water and electricity to order and security.

These elected governing bodies have adequate awareness to apply the Local Administration Law 107, a law approved by the Syrian Government in 2011, in order to maintain the unity of the Syrian territories and fill the gap for social and governmental organizations in regions free from the governing dictatorial authorities.

With the aim of supporting these local councils, the Local Development Organization (LDO) was established by a number of experts to support local administrations in the fields of governance, economy and community development. LDO seeks to achieve a framework that helps local councils and their communities to achieve professional standards and good governance.

Timeline from 2011-now

Facts & Figures

In March 2011, violence sparks in Daraa after a number of teenagers and children are arrested for taking part in political graffiti. Peaceful anti-government demonstrations begin as a result, but these quickly escalate and dozens of people are killed when the government’s security forces violently crackdown.

2011

Facts & Figures

In March 2011, violence sparks in Daraa after a number of teenagers and children are arrested for taking part in political graffiti. Peaceful anti-government demonstrations begin as a result, but these quickly escalate and dozens of people are killed when the government’s security forces violently crackdown.

2011

Facts & Figures

Every year of the conflict has seen an exponential growth in refugees. In July 2012, there were 100,000 refugees,
In 2012, the US closes its embassy in Damascus and recalls its diplomats and the Gulf Cooperation Council announces its member states are pulling their ambassadors from Damascus and expelling the Syrian ambassadors in their countries. The United Nations General Assembly, in this year, passes a nonbinding resolution endorsing the Arab League plan for al-Assad to step down. The vote was 137 in favor and 12 against, with 17 abstentions.

2012

Facts & Figures

Every year of the conflict has seen an exponential growth in refugees. In July 2012, there were 100,000 refugees,
In 2012, the US closes its embassy in Damascus and recalls its diplomats and the Gulf Cooperation Council announces its member states are pulling their ambassadors from Damascus and expelling the Syrian ambassadors in their countries. The United Nations General Assembly, in this year, passes a nonbinding resolution endorsing the Arab League plan for al-Assad to step down. The vote was 137 in favor and 12 against, with 17 abstentions.

2012

Facts & Figures

At the start of 2013, there were 1.5 million refugees and the UN Security Council estimates that the number of civilians killed in the two-year civil war in Syria is approaching 70,000.

The UN and the United States request an urgent investigation of Syrian activists’ claims that the al-Assad government used chemical weapons in an attack on civilians on 21st August. It is estimated that more than 1,300 people were killed in the attack outside Damascus, many of them women and children.

2013

Facts & Figures

At the start of 2013, there were 1.5 million refugees and the UN Security Council estimates that the number of civilians killed in the two-year civil war in Syria is approaching 70,000.

The UN and the United States request an urgent investigation of Syrian activists’ claims that the al-Assad government used chemical weapons in an attack on civilians on 21st August. It is estimated that more than 1,300 people were killed in the attack outside Damascus, many of them women and children.

2013

Facts & Figures

In February 2014, a second round of peace talks ends in Geneva, Switzerland with no progress in ending the war in Syria. Al-Assad is re-elected, reportedly having received a majority 88.7% of the vote in the country’s first election since war started in 2011.

2014

Facts & Figures

In February 2014, a second round of peace talks ends in Geneva, Switzerland with no progress in ending the war in Syria. Al-Assad is re-elected, reportedly having received a majority 88.7% of the vote in the country’s first election since war started in 2011.

2014

Facts & Figures

The situation in Syria goes from bad to worse when outside parties begin launching airstrikes in the fall of 2015, with an increase in the number of civilian casualties and families forced to leave their homes in search of safety.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says that the United States will deploy Special Operations Forces to be sent to Kurdish-controlled territory in northern Syria. The American troops will help local Kurdish and Arab forces fighting ISIS with logistics and are planning to strengthen their efforts.

2015

Facts & Figures

The situation in Syria goes from bad to worse when outside parties begin launching airstrikes in the fall of 2015, with an increase in the number of civilian casualties and families forced to leave their homes in search of safety.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says that the United States will deploy Special Operations Forces to be sent to Kurdish-controlled territory in northern Syria. The American troops will help local Kurdish and Arab forces fighting ISIS with logistics and are planning to strengthen their efforts.

2015

Facts & Figures

In December 2016, fighting in Aleppo City intensified and East Aleppo, the final stronghold within the city, fell. People were forced to flee their homes and evacuate the city. We met those who made it out with critical supplies in areas of northern Syria. Now, even more Syrians have been displaced.

According to the U.N., $4.5 billion was required in 2016 to provide emergency support and stabilization to families throughout the region — only $2.9 billion was received as of March 2017.

2016

Facts & Figures

In December 2016, fighting in Aleppo City intensified and East Aleppo, the final stronghold within the city, fell. People were forced to flee their homes and evacuate the city. We met those who made it out with critical supplies in areas of northern Syria. Now, even more Syrians have been displaced.

According to the U.N., $4.5 billion was required in 2016 to provide emergency support and stabilization to families throughout the region — only $2.9 billion was received as of March 2017.

2016

Facts & Figures

OCHA states that as of March 2017, more than 5 million Syrians have fled the country, with over 3 million in Turkey, in excess of 1 million in Lebanon, approximately 650,000 in Jordan, and many more scattered in various other countries in addition to 6.3 million people internally displaced and in need of assistance.

According to U.N. statistics, $4.6 billion was required in 2017 to provide emergency support and stabilization to families throughout Syria, however less than half this number has been received.

It is crucially important that, as well as funding emergency assistance, donors, governments and the U.N fund long-term programs and governance projects that address the underlying causes of the conflict, build resilience and promote peaceful communities for a sustainable future.

2017

Facts & Figures

OCHA states that as of March 2017, more than 5 million Syrians have fled the country, with over 3 million in Turkey, in excess of 1 million in Lebanon, approximately 650,000 in Jordan, and many more scattered in various other countries in addition to 6.3 million people internally displaced and in need of assistance.

According to U.N. statistics, $4.6 billion was required in 2017 to provide emergency support and stabilization to families throughout Syria, however less than half this number has been received.

It is crucially important that, as well as funding emergency assistance, donors, governments and the U.N fund long-term programs and governance projects that address the underlying causes of the conflict, build resilience and promote peaceful communities for a sustainable future.

2017

Total Beneficiaries

The total number of beneficiaries from LDO’s projects are broken down into three main categories.

993
Local
Councils
570
NGO’s
4952
Beneficiaries

Success Stories

Bringing Back Forgotten Emotions

Mohammed Hussein worked as an agricultural engineer in the Agriculture Directorate in Aleppo. He obtained a master’s degree in the field of Renewable Resources from Aleppo University, upon the war reaching his home town of rural southern Aleppo where he and his family live. Mohammed…

Creating Opportunities

Mahmoud Al-Qasim is a chemical engineer who has vast previous experience in working in the field of agriculture, soil and chemical fertilizers, in the Ministry of Local Administration in the Environment Department. Mahmoud has said that: ‘Following the start of the conflict in Syria, the…

A Sense of Belonging

Fahd Al-Ali is an internally displaced person (IDP) from Aleppo who is now located in a camp in the city of Mare. Despite the difficulties of living in the camps and the scarcity of employment opportunities, Fahd was ecstatic at the chance when he was…

Photo Gallery

Descriptive Photos of the work that the Local Development Organization has undertaken over the years, with the support of its partners, Network team inside Syria and its employees and Consultants:

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